Upcoming Events

Hebrews, James, and 1 Peter

September 17-18, 2021

Via Zoom

Professor Wally Taylor

What does it mean to be faithful witnesses when enthusiasm is lagging, people are in need, or Christians are being rejected by their society? Hebrews, James, and 1 Peter provide models of how Christians are able to witness in such situations. Dr. Taylor will also include materials from Ephesians/Colossians (mainly Ephesians) and the Pastoral Epistles (1-2 Timothy, Titus).

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Pastoral Care Assistant Training - Part I

October 2, 2021

Via Zoom

Professor Rosanne Swanson

What do you say when you don't know what to say. Listening with the ear of the heart. Before the session, please read the book Conversation as Ministry: Stories and Strategies for Confident Caregiving by Douglass Purnell (Pilgrim Press, Cleveland (2003)). Purchase on Amazon.

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Daniel, Apocalyptic, and the Early Jewish Period

October 15-16, 2021

Via Zoom

Professor Kelly Murphy

Extreme violence, including death, was used against Jews who disobeyed Antiochus' edicts by reading the Scriptures, having their children circumcised, and worshipping the God of Israel. These dire circumstances raised profound questions for the people of God. How can God's people be faithful witnesses in the face of such a catastrophe? What does it mean to hope? And who is God?

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Pastoral Care Assistant Training - Part II

October 23, 2021

Via Zoom

Professor Rosanne Swanson

What do you say when you don't know what to say. Listening with the ear of the heart. Before the session, please read the book Conversation as Ministry: Stories and Strategies for Confident Caregiving by Douglass Purnell (Pilgrim Press, Cleveland (2003)). Purchase on Amazon.

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Revelation

November 12-13, 2021

Via Zoom

Professor Kelly Murphy

We recently took our initial plunge into apocalyptic literature and discovered that the stimulating world of apocalyptic symbols, colors, and numbers can be confusing. Revelation is the only entire book in the New Testament devoted to apocalyptic thought. It is an exciting and challenging book. Revelation has frequently been misused. It has been divorced from its historical setting and understood as a book of secret codes that program how God will act at the end of time. Revelation does tell us how the story will end: It will end with defeat of all evil with God united with God's people. The exact timetable, however, is not outlined in Revelation (or anywhere else in the Bible). In fact, the author tells us not to read his book as though it were a schedule. Jesus, despite all attempts to predict the end, will come like a thief (16:15). What is painted in the stark colors of Revelation is a series of impressionistic paintings that witness to God's activity in the past, present, and future.

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